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12 FRESH ORGANIC OPTIONS IN BUENOS AIRES

Louise Carr de Olmedo Eating in a wholesome, sustainable way in this urban metropolis is a challenge. But persist because the rewards are rich – for your health, and your taste buds. Rest assured you can find a thriving, fresh organic food movement in Buenos Aires. You’ve just got to know where to look. Can You Find Organic Food in Argentina? The organic food movement in Argentina has a relatively short history. In 1985 the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates only five farmers were producing organically. During the 90s, the organic sector became more professional and organised.¡ and Argentina was certified fit to export organic produce to the EC. Now Argentina is one of the world’s largest producers of certified organic apples and pears and a number of organizations inspect produce for organic standards. Thanks to physical conditions like naturally fertile soil, low use of chemicals in conventional farming, low pest levels, and plenty of virgin land, the conversion to organic production is easier in Argentina than other countries. But organic food has not been wildly popular in the general market, where people are disinclined to pay more for something they don’t see as being “better”. If you’re looking for organic food in Argentina, you do have to dig deep sometimes. But Buenos Aires is the best place to find it. Supermarkets sell organic...

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MARIANO RAMON, GRAN DABBANG IN BUENOS AIRES

Allie Lazar The best chefs of Buenos Aires reveal how to make their restaurant’s most popular dishes. Swiss Chard Pakoras & Carrot Chutney, recipe by Mariano Ramon from Gran Dabbang in Buenos Aires.  If chef Mariano Ramon ever took the pakoras off the ever-changing menu at Gran Dabbang in Palermo, the restaurant’s regulars would totally freak out. The crispy and lightly fried pakoras de acelga (swiss chard pakoras) have been on Dabbang’s menu since the beginning, and were originally added as a way to incorporate an Indian-style tempura element that was also vegetarian friendly. Mariano Ramón. Photo by Dabbang A popular food found throughout India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, pakoras come in many shapes, sizes, and forms. It can be compared to tempura in Japan or buñuelos in Argentina, all which share a similar fritter-like concept: take a vegetable or meat, batter it, lightly fry it, and serve with some sort of delicious dipping sauce. Pakoras at Gran Dabbang “In India, there are so many different varieties of pakoras, it’s a snack you find everywhere,” Ramon tells me. “The chutney-yogurt combination is a classic pair, not just when making pakoras, but in lots of different dish preparations. Our recipes aren’t traditional, but we use the same balanced flavor profiles to season our dishes.” The pakora not only transformed (by popular demand) into Dabbang’s signature dish, but it started popping up...

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FOUR NOTABLE CORNER BARS IN BUENOS AIRES

Sorrel Moseley-Williams You’ve got a favourite corner bar in Buenos Aires, haven’t you? Whichever neighbourhood you live in or have stayed in, there’s surely one watering-hole, a bar de la esquina, that’s captured your heart. Thanks to their very architecture, corner bars in Buenos Aires tend to be the prettiest, standing out for that bevelled, three-sided entrance (known as arquitectura en ochava in Spanish) that lets diners and drinkers inadvertently interact, gazing out at a city in movement. And many of these classic establishments date back to the 19th century, oozing history, stories – oh, the tales these floors and walls could tell! Here, The Real Argentina visits four emblematic esquinas in Buenos Aires. LA FLOR DE BARRACAS, Barracas An insider view of the corner. Ph by La Flor de Barracas While paperwork confirms that La flor de Barracas has operated since 1906, it’s more likely this corner bar opened nine years earlier in 1897, according to current co-owner Carlos Cantini. But it certainly wasn’t one of Barracas’ emblematic esquinas back then… Carlos says: “Originally called Fonda genoa (Genovese Tavern), this establishment has always served up food and drinks. And back then, right opposite, was the railway repair yard. That attracted all sorts of changarines (casual labourers) and characters working there; so many, that this area was known for its knife fights.” Known variously as Luna Tarzan and even...

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Latin Dating Tips & Advice

Sorrel Moseley-Williams This is not a Facebook relationship status but trust me, it’s complicated. Embarking on the minefield which is Latin dating can be riddled with uneven paths and furious explosions as well as tears, suffering and angst. Over the top? No way, José – I was married to an Argentine for nine years and could be the person to get you clambering over the initial hurdles with some first dating tips. My lessons in Argentine love kick off with a psychology degree. If you’re already qualified, then you’re streets ahead of the rest of us. Your journey and my story end here. Three extra years of studies aside, a peek at the national psyche won’t hurt: around two-thirds of Argentines’ roots belong in the birthplace of the pizza (classic date fodder, by the way) and if anyone likes a drama, it’s the Italians. The eruptions, the bubbling passion, the fire – Vesuvius might as well be mixed into the Argentine gene pool. “You have to work much harder, that’s for sure” – British man Blowing hot and cold is all part of the game so take an Argentine-size pinch of salt when embarking on a new adventure. One blogger simply calls it a “rollercoaster”. In fact, you’ll have to work even harder since being single is apparently in fashion, even when Tinder and Happn are the most popular...

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Four classic corner restaurants in Buenos Aires

Sorrel Moseley-Williams You’ve got a favourite corner restaurant in Buenos Aires, haven’t you? Whichever neighbourhood you live in or have stayed in, there’s surely one establishment, a restorán de la esquina, that’s captured your heart. Thanks to their very architecture, corner establishments in Buenos Aires stand out for that bevelled, three-sided entrance (known as arquitectura en ochava in Spanish) that lets diners and drinkers inadvertently interact, gazing out at a city in movement. And many of these classic establishments date back to the 19th century, oozing history, stories – oh, the tales these floors and walls could tell! Here, The Real Argentina visits four emblematic restaurant esquinas in Buenos Aires. EL IMPERIO DE LA PIZZA, Chacarita Photo by Jorge Soto Not only is El imperio de la pizza perfectly placed on the cross streets of Avenues Corrientes and Federico Lacroze, one of Chacarita’s busiest esquinas, but this emblematic pizzería cleverly set up shop slap bang in front of a prime transport hub as well as Argentina’s largest cemetery; the living still have to eat, after all. Night manager Jorge Soto explains El Imperio’s success since opening its three sets of doors in 1947. “This corner sees a lot of people from diverse backgrounds pass through: street vendors, office workers, labourers. They all stop by as we’re right in front of Federico Lacroze train and subway stations and from the...

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